September 14, 2013

J.R. Lindermuth


J.R. Lindermuth Digs for Gold

 
J. R. Lindermuth is the author of 12 novels, including five in the Sticks Hetrick mystery series set in a fictional rural community near Harrisburg PA. A retired newspaper editor/writer, he is now librarian of his county's historical society where he assists patrons with research and genealogy. He has published stories and articles in a variety of magazines, both print and on line.
Additional information on his books and writing is available at www.jrlindermuth.net . 
 
 
Could you please start by telling us a little about yourself?
I’m a retired newspaper editor who lives and writes in central Pennsylvania. Since retiring, I’ve served as librarian of my county historical society where I assist patrons with research and genealogy. I’m a member of EPIC, International Thriller Writers and the Short Mystery Society. 

Please tell us a little about your new release without giving too much of a spoiler away.
It’s 1898 and Sylvester Tilghman, third of his family to hold the job of sheriff in
the little town of Arahpot, Pennsylvania, has a murder victim with too many enemies. There’s Claude Kessler, who is found standing over the body of Will Petry with a knife in his hand; there’s Rachel, Petry’s stepdaughter who admits she meant to cause him harm, and there’s a band of gypsies who claim Petry stole one of their women.
If that isn’t enough to complicate Tilghman’s life, add in threats to his job; a run-in with a female horse thief; scary predictions by a gypsy fortuneteller; the theft of Doc Mariner’s new motorcar, and the continued reluctance of Lydia, Syl’s longtime girlfriend, to marry him. 

What comes first: the plot or the characters?
Character makes the plot. 

Do you plan all your characters out before you start a story or do they develop as you write?
I “invent” my characters, but they often seem to have minds of their own as to what’s going to happen next. It usually works best if I listen to what they’re telling me.

Do you have a ritual when it comes to writing? Example….get coffee, blanket, paper, pen, laptop and a comfy place.
I believe in setting butt in chair and fingers on keyboard. Since I’m often writing in my mind before taking the seat, I don’t usually need more impetus. A cup of coffee or two is good in the morning and some background music (not too loud or strident) helps shut out other distractions.  

Do your books have a common theme or are they all different?
I write two series, so there’s a commonality to the characters but not necessarily the plots. I’ve also written some standalones. 

How long does it take you to write and then edit a story?
That depends on the particular story. The first draft of some has gone very quickly. Others might take years to develop. All will then face editing, the amount of which again depends on the story. 

How do you go about naming characters?
In my other work as a genealogist I’m constantly on the look out for names that might suit a character down the road. I jot these down in a notebook for future reference. The name has to suit the character, though, and there have been instances where I’ve changed a name because it didn’t ring true. 

What so you see for the future of publishing and e-books?
I love so called “real” books and I think they’re going to be with us as least for some time in the future. However, I like the convenience of my Kindle, particularly when traveling, and I think we’re only at the beginning of the electronic novel age. Who would have thought just a few years ago that it would be possible to read a book on your phone?

What are your current books out right now, and what are the books coming up for release?
This is the second book in the Tilghman series and there are now five in the Sticks Hetrick series. A Burning Desire, sixth in the Hetrick series, will be coming out next March and I’m currently at work on a seventh. 

What do you like to do when you’re not writing?
I enjoy spending time with my children and my four grandsons. I like to walk/hike, draw, do genealogy. I read (constantly). I love music and film. If I had the money I’d do a whole lot more traveling. I can’t understand people who say they’re bored. There isn’t enough time in the days to do all the things I’d like to do. 

Is there anything else you would like to tell the readers we have not touched on?
For those who have read and said they’ve enjoyed my books, I want to express my appreciation. If you’ve written a review or recommended them to family and friends, I’m even more grateful. A writer is nothing without readers.  

Where can the readers learn more about you and find your books on the web?


Ø Buy links:



 

CONTEST ALERT!!!

John is offering a print copy to a commenter to be selected by drawing.
 

14 comments:

Patricia Gligor said...

Great post, John. I especially liked the point you made that "writers are nothing without readers." Getting the word out about our books (promotion) and convincing readers to buy them can be a difficult task these days - so many authors, so many great books! I loved "Sooner than Gold."

jrlindermuth said...

Thanks, Patricia. You are so right about the difficulties. The reward comes in hearing someone liked what you've written.

margaret blake said...

Great post John, I think we are twins, agree with lots that you have to say. Yep, Kindle is great, especially for travelling but a real book is a real book! Can't wait to read your latest. Lots of luck with it.

margaret blake said...

Great post John, I think we are twins, agree with lots that you have to say. Yep, Kindle is great, especially for travelling but a real book is a real book! Can't wait to read your latest. Lots of luck with it.

jrlindermuth said...

Thanks, Margaret. As always, appreciate the support.

Marilyn Meredith a.k.a. F. M. Meredith said...

It's fun to read your responses--and I agree with you on the book/Kindle thing. Read both, though have my Kindle books on my iPad.

Roxe Anne Peacock said...

Loved your post, John. It is amazing how characters take on a life of their own. We have a lot in common. Best of luck with Sooner than Gold.

jrlindermuth said...

Thanks Marilyn and Roxe Anne. Two people who also know the importance of supporting one another.

C.L. Swinney said...

Any one on the edge about picking up Sooner Than Gold should jump over with both feet! Excellent read and great author.

jrlindermuth said...

Can't ask for a better recommendation than that. Thanks, Chris.

Eileen Obser said...

So nice to read this, John, and get to know you better. I love your comments about how you keep busy and don't have time to be bored. I agree totally!

jrlindermuth said...

Thanks, Eileen. I think people who get bored with life just haven't exercised their imagination.

jrlindermuth said...

sThanks, Eileen. I think people who get bored with life just haven't exercised their imagination.

jrlindermuth said...

Thanks for providing this opportunity, Debbie.